Supporting CBOs to Combat Community Violence

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Supporting CBOs to Combat Community Violence
United States of America
To support community-based organizations (CBOs) in community violence prevention with technical assistance from CDC.
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Nkiru Nnawulezi Receives 2021 Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award

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Continuing the Work to Prevent Veteran Suicide

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Preventing Child Sexual Abuse in Youth-Serving Organizations

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Preventing Child Sexual Abuse in Youth-Serving Organizations
United States of America
To provide effective, evidence-based guidance for proactively protecting children and youth from sexual abuse in youth-serving organizations.
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Warrior Built: Strengthening the Eco-System for Veteran Suicide Prevention

In July 2021, the CDC Foundation and CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control worked with DC Design, a social impact and design strategy firm, to host public, federal and private partners at the Warrior Built: Strengthening the Eco-System for Veteran Suicide Prevention convening. This was the first convening of its kind focusing on the collaborative impact with state health departments. The convening was designed to: 

  • increase linkages between state/local public health partners, community-based veteran-serving organizations and private sector partners;
  • to catalyze state and community action; and 
  • to activate public-private partnerships that help fill gaps and create more opportunity around an upstream approach to veteran suicide prevention. 

As part of this initiative, the CDC Foundation utilized a human-centered design approach to identify partner needs and potential opportunities for collaboration to help advance the upstream approach to veteran suicide prevention. 

From the convening, persona profiles and stakeholder priority documents were created to highlight the gaps between partners and the individual needs of each group. These resources are provided for partners to share with other organizations working in the field.

The CDC Foundation continues to work on building resources and tools to share with the veteran and military community to enhance communication, increase partnership, and support partners as they work together to implement upstream veteran suicide prevention programming. This webpage will be updated as new resources are developed. 

 

Blog from November 2021: Building Better Relationships to Serve Veterans

Disparities in Suicide: 

  • Veterans have an adjusted suicide rate that is 52.3% greater than the non-veteran US adult population. 
  • People who have previously served in the military account for about 13.7% of suicides among adults in the United States. 
  • In 2019, 1.6% of former active-duty service members aged 18-25 years reported making a suicide attempt during the previous 12 months. This was an increase from 0.9% in 2009.

This webpage is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $140,000 with 100 percent funded by CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government.

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injury prevention
Warrior Built: Strengthening the Eco-System for Veteran Suicide Prevention
United States of America
To build capacity of community-based organizations serving U.S. military veterans to help prevent suicide among veterans by exploring gaps and opportunities around an upstream approach to veteran suicide prevention.
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Building Capacity to Prevent Veteran Suicide

Program Impact

"I see that across a lot of different partnerships, that we are definitely in a lot of conversations that we never would have been in had we not been part of that [VSPE grantee cohort]."

- Year 2 Grant Recipient

"We have shared the logic model we created with funders, the program team and our Board. It’s given them a clear layout of what we currently do and what we hope to do in the future."

- Year 3 Grant Recipient

"Last year we were able to raise more than we had in the three years prior combined, and we believe that it's a direct result of this project. We were able to demonstrate and articulate our impact in those grant applications pulling directly from our logic model."

- Year 2 Grant Recipient

"Being able to better communicate our impact, our results with kind of all the stakeholders, whether it's internal or external, and really understanding and being able to communicate the needs of veterans and how our upstream approaches differ … I think has been a really important skill that I don't think I was expecting to come from this, and it has been really instrumental in so many different aspects of our organization."

- Year 3 Grant Recipient

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicide is a leading cause of death for Americans overall and rose 33 percent between 1999 and 2019. In 2020, the year for which we have the most recent mortality data, nearly 46,000 lives were lost to suicide. Mental health conditions are often seen as the sole cause of suicide, but suicide is rarely caused by any single factor. In fact, many people who die by suicide are not known to have a diagnosed mental health condition at the time of death. Other problems often contribute to suicide, such as those related to relationships, substance misuse, physical health, and job, money, legal, or housing stress.

Veterans are a particularly vulnerable population. Data from the Department of Veteran Affairs from 2019 show the veteran suicide rate was 1.5 times higher than non-veterans. The rate of suicide among younger veterans aged 18-34 far exceeds that of other age groups, while the number of veteran deaths by suicide is highest among those aged 55-74.

The good news is that prevention is possible. Suicide is rarely caused by any single factor, which means there are multiple pathways for prevention. To help veteran-serving organizations (VSOs) better evaluate the effectiveness of their suicide prevention programs, the CDC Foundation was awarded a federal grant to work on the Veteran Suicide Prevention: Evaluation Demonstration (VSPE) Project in partnership with the CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 

Over the past four years, the CDC Foundation has awarded and administered short-term mini grants to VSOs that are implementing suicide prevention programs focused on reducing risk factors and promote protective factors. The funding supports VSO grantees in developing, implementing and strengthening program evaluation. VSOs can use this data and feedback to continually assess and improve their work by ensuring they reach their target populations, assessing the effectiveness of the program among specific populations and identifying successes, challenges and areas to focus their resources.

Each project year has focused on either formative, process or outcome evaluation to understand program efficiency and to measure the extent to which a program aligns with its objectives. This year the CDC Foundation will provide additional funding for VSOs to continue to build evaluation capacity, learning the fundamentals of formative and process evaluation methods.

CDC is working towards broader, community-level protection against suicide. By building the evidence base around what works within existing VSO prevention programs, this project aims ultimately to prevent and reduce veteran suicide by reaching those at risk before they are in crisis.

For more information or to get involved in the program, email VSPEvaluation@cdcfoundation.org


This webpage is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totaling $2,000,000 with 100 percent funded by CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government.

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veteran suicide prevention
United States of America
To build capacity of community-based veterans serving organizations to test and implement CDC’s veteran suicide prevention strategies.
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