Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) Environmental Study

757
environmental health
Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Ch
United States of America
To examine the association of exposure to phthalates with health outcomes in child development using samples collected from participants of the Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas (CHAMACOS) study. CDC's Organic Analytical Toxicology Branch will measure the urinary concentrations of phthalate metabolites in urine collected from CHAMACOS participants. Approximately 700 samples will be analyzed for phthalate metabolites.
University of California Berkeley (National Institutes of Health)
CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health

Prenatal Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants

745
pregnant woman
Prenatal Exposure to Persistent Organic Pollutants
Mexico
To measure persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metal concentrations in women in the third trimester of their pregnancy as proxy indicators of fetus exposure in the same period of time.
National Institute of Public Health of Mexico
CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health

Maternal Organics Monitoring Study

736
environmental health
Maternal Organics Monitoring Study
Alaska, USA
United States of America
To collect and analyze biological (blood, cord, urine) samples from 200 Alaska Native mother-infant pairs over the period of one year. The levels of persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, cytokines, selenium and a fatty acid profile in pregnant women and newborn infants will be measured, as will levels of radioactive isotopes, phthalate, mercury, arsenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and phytoestrogensin.
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
CDC’s National Center for Environmental Health

KEMSA E-Mobile Launch in Kenya

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Wazazi Nipendeni: How text messages are supporting mothers in Tanzania

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Honoring International Women's Day

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Safe Delivery for Mothers in Kenya

safe delivery for mothers in kenyaIn rural western Kenya, only 40 percent of pregnant women deliver in a healthcare facility. Your gift of $15 to the CDC Foundation's Safe Delivery in Kenya program will help CDC and its partners provide transportation to a healthcare facility for expecting mothers and ensure that women giving birth in a facility or at home have access to a safe delivery kit and blood supply.

CDC has a significant presence in Kenya, working with partners to protect people, save lives and turn science into action. Key activities include working with partners to conduct disease surveillance, research on protecting people from malaria—particularly pregnant women, and programs to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

CDC-Kenya works with healthcare providers and community health workers to help ensure that both mothers and newborns are protected from infections and complications during delivery. In Kenya, 7,700 women die each year from complications caused by pregnancy and childbirth despite the fact that almost 90 percent of them are preventable. The leading causes of maternal death in Kenya are from obstetric complications such as severe bleeding, obstructed labor and indirect causes such as AIDS/HIV, malaria and TB, which are aggravated during pregnancy. Healthcare providers and community health workers often do not have access to adequate supplies and equipment needed for a safe delivery due to funding gaps.

CDC-Kenya: Protecting Mothers and Babies from Deadly Health Threats

To prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV, CDC-Kenya works to ensure that pregnant women receive routine HIV testing, that HIV-infected mothers and their exposed infants receive anti-retroviral therapy and that families receive education on safe infant feeding practices.To contribute to the world's knowledge about how best to protect pregnant women from malaria, CDC-Kenya conducts research on intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp). Within this research context, CDC-Kenya has been able to provide participating mothers health education, free transportation to deliver in a healthcare facility and waived delivery costs, which has resulted in over 90% of the participants delivering at a health facility.

Funding provided to the CDC Foundation's Safe Delivery for Mothers in Kenya program will allow CDC to extend free transportation and supplies for safe delivery to pregnant women outside the IPTp research study. CDC-Kenya conducts door-to-door interviews every four months in three districts in western Kenya to collect data on births, deaths, illnesses and pregnancies. As researchers visit households to collect data, thanks to contributions to the CDC Foundation program, they are able to distribute safe delivery kits and offer transportation for pregnant women to a healthcare facility for delivery.

 

669
kenya
Safe Delivery for Mothers in Kenya
Kenya
To help CDC and its partners in rural western Kenya provide transportation to a healthcare facility for expecting mothers and ensure that women giving birth in a facility or at home have access to a safe delivery kit and blood supply.
Multiple individuals and organizations
CDC's Center for Global Health

Reproductive Health Issues and Exposure to PBBs

631
Lab
Reproductive Health Issues and Exposure to PBBs
Michigan, USA
United States of America
To measure polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and determine the extent of endocrine disruption resulting from exposure to these compounds.
Emory University (National Institutes of Health)
CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Parenting in Kansas

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Promoting Positive Parenting

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