Business Health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) proactively protects U.S. businesses. Employers rely on CDC to solve global health threats and keep workers safe from health emergencies, flu outbreaks, travel health risks, foodborne illnesses and many other health concerns. Explore five important ways CDC works to keep America’s businesses and employees, safe and secure.

5 Ways CDC protects the health of your business

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1. Emergency Preparedness and Response

As America’s health protection agency, CDC is ready 24/7 to rapidly deploy disease detectives, life-saving vaccines and medicines and other support during a health emergency—whether natural disaster, disease outbreak or deliberate attack.

Health Emergencies Disrupt Business Continuity

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1.

Flu Pandemic

An influenza (flu) pandemic could cause a serious impact on the U.S. economy, with immediate costs of $100-$250 billion.

2.

Preparedness

Are your employees ready for the next disaster? Only 2 in 10 employees feel prepared for a catastrophic event.

3.

Ebola

When fear of Ebola swept through America, airline stocks declined and some airline employees refused to report for work.

Sources
How CDC Helps Business

How CDC helps business

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Leads a 24/7 Emergency Operations Center to monitor emergency responses to health threats in America and abroad, including foodborne disease outbreaks, weather events and influenza.

In the event of an emergency, CDC can distribute large quantities of life-saving medicine and medical supplies from the Strategic National Stockpile anywhere in America within 12 hours.

In 2014, the stockpile included $2.7 million worth of personal protective equipment to assist U.S. hospitals caring for Ebola patients.

Provides emergency preparedness information to current and potential business partners.

2. Travelers’ Health

CDC’s comprehensive travelers’ health information and advice helps protect U.S. citizens and businesses from diseases and other health risks abroad. In addition to delivering a wide range of travel health resources, CDC works with global partners to prevent catastrophic outbreaks, detect and communicate threats early and mobilize effective responses.

Protecting Business Travelers

An estimated 5.2 million U.S. residents travel internationally annually for business, many to developing countries.

 
For every 100,000 travelers visiting a developing country for 1 month, an average of:
50,000
 
For every 100,000 travelers visiting a developing country for 1 month, an average of:
8,000
 
For every 100,000 travelers visiting a developing country for 1 month, an average of:
5,000
 
For every 100,000 travelers visiting a developing country for 1 month, an average of:
300
 
For every 100,000 travelers visiting a developing country for 1 month, an average of:
50
 
For every 100,000 travelers visiting a developing country for 1 month, an average of:
1
Sources
consider the cost
how cdc helps business

Consider the cost: treatment vs prevention

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Condition Treatment Prevention
Malaria $25,250 plus an average of 6-24 work days lost $162 Average cost to prevent malaria in a business traveler
Hepatitis A $1,800 to $2,500 plus an average of 27 work days lost $200 to $300 For a complete two-dose hepatitis A vaccination
Medical Evacuation Abroad $25,000 to $250,000 Emergency evacuations $15 to $370 Medical evacuation insurance for a two-week trip
Source

How CDC helps business

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Offers destination-specific information through the CDC Travelers’ Health website on health-related topics including vaccinations and medicines, food and water precautions and other illness and injury prevention.

Informs international business travelers and their clinicians about health risks through CDC’s Yellow Book, the industry’s authoritative reference guide.

Publishes travel health notices to update travelers about new and emerging health risks.

Delivers helpful mobile apps and social media messaging on Twitter and Facebook to help international travelers stay safe and healthy.

3. Global Health Security

Global health security ensures safer nations and more stable economies. In today’s highly mobile and interconnected world, an outbreak anywhere is a threat everywhere. New germs are emerging and spreading, drug resistance is rising and laboratories around the world could intentionally or unintentionally release dangerous diseases. Globalization of travel and trade increases the chance and speed of these risks spreading.

Global Health Threats Impact the Economy

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1. Ebola Epidemic

2. Influenza

3. SARS Epidemic

About two-thirds of the world’s countries remain unprepared to prevent, detect and respond to infectious disease threats, making these countries less attractive to global investment.

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Ebola Virus

The 2014 Ebola epidemic in West Africa crippled the economies of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Estimated Annual Economic Burden:
At least $1.6 billion in 2015

Source
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Influenza Virus

Flu pandemics have caused widespread global illness with severe cases resulting in hospitalization and sometimes death.  Pandemics can strain international commerce and national economies.

Estimated Annual U.S. Economic Burden:
More than $87 billion

Source
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Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

According to the World Health Organization, 8,098 people worldwide became sick with SARS during a 2003 outbreak. Of these, 774 died.

Estimated Economic Burden:
Globally, $40 billion in just 4 months

Source
how cdc helps business

how cdc helps business

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Advances the Global Health Security Agenda to stop disease outbreaks that impact travel and trade by closing the gaps in prevention, detection and response to infectious disease threats.

Works every day to detect and respond to disease threats through CDC’s Global Disease Detection Centers, Field Epidemiology Training Programs and the Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System.

Rapidly shares updates and recommendations for prevention and treatment among public health officials and partners through the Health Alert Network.

Provides in-depth health briefings through CDC Grand Rounds and CDC Business Health Executive Quarterly Calls.

4. Food Safety

Foodborne diseases are challenging for America’s employers, from rising healthcare costs associated with treating foodborne illnesses to lost worker productivity. CDC protects America’s businesses, employees and their families by linking illness in people to specific foods and informing food safety policies and practices to make food safer and save lives.

Foodborne Illness and Workplace Health

Sources
 

Each year, 1 in 6 Americans get sick from a foodborne disease, 128,000 are hospitalized and 3,000 die.

 

Reducing foodborne illness rates by 10 percent would keep 5 million Americans from getting sick each year.

 

Foodborne illness is estimated to cost the United States more than $15.5 billion annually.

 

Multistate foodborne outbreaks are responsible for 56 percent of all reported foodborne outbreak deaths.

46 percent of multistate outbreaks result in product recalls.

 

The germs that contaminate food can become resistant to antibiotics.

Salmonella and Campylobacter, transmitted commonly through food, cause an estimated 410,000 antibiotic-resistant infections in the United States each year.

How CDC Helps Business

How CDC Helps Business

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Provides comprehensive foodborne illness data and analyses to help keep Americans healthier and safer.

Detects and investigates outbreaks to stop their spread and learn how to prevent the next one. Advances “DNA fingerprinting” of germs to find outbreaks when they are small, and conducts more than 25 national or multistate investigations—and more than 1,000 state and local ones—each year.

Works with partners, including the food industry, to respond faster to outbreaks and to keep them from happening in the first place.

5. Flu Prevention

While an annual flu vaccine is the best way to prevent influenza, three out of every five people in the United States report not being vaccinated. The impact of flu on workplace health and productivity is substantial. American businesses, employees and communities can help CDC prevent and control the flu by promoting annual flu vaccination.

Flu’s annual impact on the U.S. economy includes more than $87 billion and 17 million lost workdays
Sources

During the 2014-15 flu season there were an estimated:

40 million

illnesses

19 million

medical visits

970,000

hospitalizations

An estimated 1.9 million flu-associated illnesses were prevented by vaccination in 2014-15

Sources
How CDC Helps Business

How CDC Helps Business

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Provides a CDC Business Toolkit and free resources to help guide employers with flu-fighting strategies including useful pandemic flu preparedness tools.

Offers tailored messages for specific groups, answers to common misconceptions and a flu vaccine finder widget.

Shares online influenza resources to help employers’ healthcare clinics stay informed about flu activity and current prevention and treatment recommendations.

take action

Threats posed by health emergencies, business travel, foodborne illnesses and disease outbreaks can have a dramatic impact on business continuity and economic security. CDC offers employers a wide range of resources to safeguard American employers at home and abroad.

5 Actions to Keep Your Workplace Healthy, Safe and Secure

Emergency Preparedness and Response

Develop and exercise emergency preparedness plans at your workplace, encourage your employees to be prepared at home and sign up for CDC’s Health Alert Network.

Travelers’ Health

Stay informed, equip medical staff with information and training, promote pre-travel health care and educate employees about the benefits of travel health insurance.

Global Health Security

Learn about the Global Health Security Agenda and explore how CDC is working in 30+ countries to stop outbreaks and improve the public’s health.

Food Safety

Help employees learn about foodborne outbreaks and how to protect themselves and their families. If you work in the food industry, make food safety a central part of your corporate culture.

Flu Prevention

Encourage employees to get a flu vaccine annually, educate employees who are at high risk of flu-related complications about the benefits of antiviral drugs and remind employees to take everyday preventive steps to stop the spread of germs.

Emergency Preparedness and Response

Develop and exercise emergency preparedness plans at your workplace, encourage your employees to be prepared at home and sign up for CDC’s Health Alert Network.

Travelers’ Health

Stay informed, equip medical staff with information and training, promote pre-travel health care and educate employees about the benefits of travel health insurance.

Global Health Security

Learn about the foodborne outbreaks and explore how CDC is working in 30+ countries to stop outbreaks and improve the public’s health.

Food Safety

Help employees learn about Global Health Security Agenda and how to protect themselves and their families. If you work in the food industry, make food safety a central part of your corporate culture.

Flu Prevention

Encourage employees to get a avele flu vaccine annually, educate employees who are at high risk of flu-related complications about the benefits of antiviral drugs and remind employees to take everyday preventative steps to stop the spread of germs.

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