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Safe Delivery for Mothers in Kenya

safe delivery for mothers in kenyaIn rural western Kenya, only 40 percent of pregnant women deliver in a healthcare facility. Your gift of $15 to the CDC Foundation's Safe Delivery in Kenya program will help CDC and its partners provide transportation to a healthcare facility for expecting mothers and ensure that women giving birth in a facility or at home have access to a safe delivery kit and blood supply.

CDC has a significant presence in Kenya, working with partners to protect people, save lives and turn science into action. Key activities include working with partners to conduct disease surveillance, research on protecting people from malaria—particularly pregnant women, and programs to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

CDC-Kenya works with healthcare providers and community health workers to help ensure that both mothers and newborns are protected from infections and complications during delivery. In Kenya, 7,700 women die each year from complications caused by pregnancy and childbirth despite the fact that almost 90 percent of them are preventable. The leading causes of maternal death in Kenya are from obstetric complications such as severe bleeding, obstructed labor and indirect causes such as AIDS/HIV, malaria and TB, which are aggravated during pregnancy. Healthcare providers and community health workers often do not have access to adequate supplies and equipment needed for a safe delivery due to funding gaps.

CDC-Kenya: Protecting Mothers and Babies from Deadly Health Threats

To prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV, CDC-Kenya works to ensure that pregnant women receive routine HIV testing, that HIV-infected mothers and their exposed infants receive anti-retroviral therapy and that families receive education on safe infant feeding practices.To contribute to the world's knowledge about how best to protect pregnant women from malaria, CDC-Kenya conducts research on intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp). Within this research context, CDC-Kenya has been able to provide participating mothers health education, free transportation to deliver in a healthcare facility and waived delivery costs, which has resulted in over 90% of the participants delivering at a health facility.

Funding provided to the CDC Foundation's Safe Delivery for Mothers in Kenya program will allow CDC to extend free transportation and supplies for safe delivery to pregnant women outside the IPTp research study. CDC-Kenya conducts door-to-door interviews every four months in three districts in western Kenya to collect data on births, deaths, illnesses and pregnancies. As researchers visit households to collect data, thanks to contributions to the CDC Foundation program, they are able to distribute safe delivery kits and offer transportation for pregnant women to a healthcare facility for delivery.

 

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kenya
Safe Delivery for Mothers in Kenya
Kenya
To help CDC and its partners in rural western Kenya provide transportation to a healthcare facility for expecting mothers and ensure that women giving birth in a facility or at home have access to a safe delivery kit and blood supply.
Multiple individuals and organizations
CDC's Center for Global Health

Global VPIBD Reference Laboratory

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Map
Global VPIBD Reference Laboratory
Australia
Bangladesh
Brazil
Colombia
Ghana
Gambia
South Korea
Mexico
Philippines
South Africa
To help CDC serve as a Global Reference Laboratory for the vaccine-preventable invasive bacterial diseases (VPIBD) laboratory network, which provides support to the global VPIBD surveillance network coordinated by the World Health Organization.
World Health Organization
CDC's Center for Global Health

Aetiology of Neonatal Infection in South Asia

 

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India mom and baby
Aetiology of Neonatal Infection in South Asia
Bangladesh
India
Pakistan
To characterize the pathogens that cause infections in young infants in developing countries, particularly Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, including a description of incidence, antimicrobial susceptibility and strain properties.
CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Atlanta International Health Fellowship Endowment

Atlanta International Health Fellowship EndowmentIn 1984, Drs. Bob Chen and Katy Irwin learned that an international member of their Epidemic Intelligence Service class was going to have to quit the two-year program because her funding had fallen through at the last moment. Because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had no way of providing financial assistance to international participants in its varied public health training courses, the two young physicians decided to remedy this situation by establishing the Atlanta International Health Fellowship (AIHF) program.

With help from other CDC employees and retirees, they set about raising funds and then formed a partnership with Emory University, which provided free tuition to one individual each year to attend Emory's International Course in Applied Epidemiology. They also formed a partnership with Villa International, which provided free housing to the AIHF recipient.

In 1997, a grant from The Tull Charitable Foundation was added to existing funds, and the Atlanta International Health Fellowship became the first endowed fund at the CDC Foundation. Since the first fellowships were awarded in 1991, 25 individuals from over 22 countries have received stipends to cover costs of travel, tuition and lodging as they enrich their public health expertise at CDC.

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Fellowship
Atlanta International Health Fellowship Endowment
United States of America
To provide funds for international participants to come to Atlanta to take part in public health courses at CDC or Emory University.
Multiple individuals and organizations; Previous Partner: The Tull Charitable Foundation
CDC's Epidemic Intelligence Service; Emory University; Villa International

Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health

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child in Thailand
Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health
Thailand
To establish a case control study of severe acute lower respiratory infections in children under age 5 in Thailand to determine the etiology and risk factors associated with pneumonia.
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)
CDC’s Center for Global Health; CDC - Thailand

Rotavirus Surveillance

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Map
Rotavirus Surveillance
United States of America
To allow countries, primarily in Asia and Africa, to continue rotavirus surveillance activities in anticipation of the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine.
GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals s.a.; Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.
CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Global Rotavirus Reference Laboratory

 

520
Rotavirus
Global Rotavirus Reference Laboratory
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Guatemala
Honduras
El Salvador
To help CDC serve as a Global Reference Laboratory for the rotavirus laboratory network, which provides support to the global rotavirus surveillance network coordinated by the World Health Organization.
World Health Organization
CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Field Epidemiology Training Program - Saudi Arabia

 

771
Saudi Arabia
Field Epidemiology Training Program - Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia
To evaluate Saudi Arabia's infectious disease surveillance system, help train local and regional disease detectives and improve the country's capacity to monitor for and respond to infectious disease outbreaks.
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health
CDC's Center for Global Health

Bed Nets for Children

Bed Nets for ChildrenThe CDC Foundation's Bed Nets for Children Program helps the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) teams purchase and distribute insecticide-treated bed nets to help protect children and families from malaria. Malaria is a leading cause of death and disease worldwide. 

The Bed Nets for Children Fund is currently supporting the Bidi Bidi Camp in Uganda. Nearly 277,000 refugees have made a home in the Bidi Bidi camp of Uganda to escape the civil war in South Sudan. Living in close quarters with poor nutrition, decreased immunity and lack of access to health services has led to a recent dramatic increase in malaria. The CDC Foundation, working with CDC, needs your help to provide insecticide-treated bed nets to Bidi Bidi to help stop the spread of malaria.

Join with us to make sure every family in Bidi Bidi has a bed net. Give Now

What is malaria?

Malaria is caused by a parasite carried by the Anopheles mosquito. People with malaria typically are very sick with high fevers, shaking chills and flu-like illness, and they can die if they do not receive proper medical treatment. Pregnant women and children under 5 who have little to no immunity are more likely to become severely ill and die.

Malaria typically is found in tropical and subtropical countries where higher temperatures allow the Anopheles mosquito to thrive. Malaria parasites, which grow and develop inside the mosquito, need warmth to complete their growth before they are mature enough to be transmitted to humans.

In sub-Saharan Africa, mosquitoes transmit malaria very efficiently, and the type of malaria parasite most common in the region causes severe, potentially fatal disease. Health experts face many challenges to building solid malaria control programs in the region, including an overall lack of resources, political instability and the emergence of malaria parasites that are increasingly resistant to antimalarial drugs.

What is an insecticide-treated bed net?

A bed net is a net that hangs above a sleeping space, usually a bed or matt, and provides a physical barrier between the malaria-carrying mosquito and the person at risk of getting the disease. An insecticide-treated bed net protects the person sleeping under the net even if the net has small holes in it, because the insecticide kills mosquitoes that do get through the net before they reach the sleeping person. Since insecticide-treated nets kill the mosquitoes, they help reduce malaria transmission community-wide (if there is high use of insecticide-treated nets in the community).

Even where insecticide-treated nets have been recommended for all children under 5 years, most children do not sleep under a bed net. A long-lasting insecticide-treated bed net costs an average of $5 and protects up to three children. Unfortunately, this cost is too high for most families in poor rural African communities who survive through subsistence farming.

How does CDC distribute bed nets? Who benefits?

The CDC Foundation's Bed Nets for Children Program provides insecticide-treated bed nets to CDC-affiliated programs.

Learn more about CDC's malaria work.

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Bed Nets for Children
Bed Nets for Children
Bed Nets
Haiti
Kenya
Uganda
To help CDC teams to purchase and distribute insecticide-treated bed nets to protect children and families from malaria.
Multiple individuals and organizations
CDC's Center for Global Health

Bob Keegan Polio Eradication Heroes Fund

Polio Eradication Heroes FundThe Bob Keegan Polio Eradication Heroes Fund recognizes health workers and volunteers who have incurred serious injury or lost their lives as a direct consequence of their participation in polio eradication activities. The families of the workers, who have been the victims of automobile crashes, military conflicts and other life-threatening events, receive a certificate recognizing the victim’s heroic commitment to polio eradication and a cash tribute.

When you see a child paralyzed with polio, and you realize that it's totally preventable with existing vaccines, there's a high level of motivation to get involved and make a difference.

The fund was established in June 2000 in partnership with major polio eradication partners. Robert "Bob" Keegan was the first contributor, donating the award money he received when we was recognized with CDC's distinguished William C. Watson Jr. Medal of Excellence. Keegan remained the fund's strongest advocate. When he retired from CDC in May 2007, he completed a bike ride across the U.S. from Florence, Oregon, to Yorktown, Virginia – 4,165 miles – to raise awareness and dollars for the polio eradication initiatives of the CDC Foundation and Rotary International. When Keegan passed away in January 2012, the CDC Foundation renamed this fund in his honor to express our gratitude for his extraordinary leadership and dedication.

"In my mind, this CDC Foundation fund is an extraordinary example of leveraging small amounts of funding to do a tremendous amount of good," said Keegan in a 2005 interview. "When you see a child paralyzed with polio, and you realize that it's totally preventable with existing vaccines, there's a high level of motivation to get involved and make a difference."

About Bob Keegan

Bob KeeganBob Keegan retired from CDC in 2007 after nearly 33 years of service. He spent the first 11 years of his career in STD control. In addition, Keegan helped to investigate Legionnaire's Disease in New York City’s Garment District in the late 1970s; worked to locate non-responders in Fulton County, GA, as part of Agent Orange studies in 1982; and helped to develop the first pre- and post-test counseling for HIV/AIDS.

From 1985–1990, Keegan coordinated CDC’s refugee health activities in Southeast Asia, helping to assure that refugees from Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos were immunized and treated for communicable diseases. In 1991, he joined the newly formed Polio Eradication Activity, which had a staff of six and an annual budget of $3 million. Since that time, the activity has grown to become CDC's Global Immunization Division (GID), with a staff of 110, and an annual budget of more than $150 million. GID has expanded to include measles mortality reduction and regional elimination, routine immunization systems strengthening, and new vaccine introduction.

Keegan’s leadership, energy and innovation played a pivotal role in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) and in accelerated global measles control and regional measles elimination initiatives. He was an outstanding mentor and technical consultant on program management and operational issues for CDC and WHO. In all his endeavors and accomplishments, Keegan demonstrated outstanding diplomacy, sensitivity and social and interpersonal skills as a CDC ambassador on global immunization to international organizations, governments and global health leaders. He was a true humanitarian who championed global sustainable development and health equity.

Keegan was a recipient of the William C. Watson Jr. Medal of Excellence and the Public Health Advisor of the Year Award from the Watsonian Society. He also received the U.S. Public Health Service Special Recognition Award (1995) for his significant achievements and service in global public health programs. He was also honored as the winner of the Philip Horne Award from CDC’s National Immunization Program (2003) and recipient of a special CDC Foundation 10th Anniversary Public Health Hero Recognition.

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Polio
Bob Keegan Polio Eradication Heroes Fund
Afghanistan
Nigeria
Pakistan
To recognize health care volunteers who have incurred serious injury or lost their lives as a direct consequence of their participation in polio eradication activities. The families of the workers, who have been the victims of automobile crashes, military conflicts and other life-threatening events, receive a certificate recognizing the victim's heroic commitment to polio eradication and a cash tribute.
Multiple individuals and organizations
CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
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